conversation

A recent Robert Wood Johnson Foundation study of workplace clinics included this:

“When it’s just a disembodied voice on a phone line in place of a face-to-face session, it’s not nearly as likely that [the employee] will form a connection with the health coach, or that the coach can figure out what makes [the employee] tick and what will drive behavior change that’s meaningful and lasting,” a benefits consultant said.

Certainly, when I’m seeking advice about human behavior, who better to ask than “a benefits consultant”?

What’s more, I’ve often heard decision-makers rush to judgement in favor of face-to-face coaching. One  benefits director, telling me about her new coaching vendor, gushed, “They only do in-person coaching, which we all know is the best!”

Well, we may all think it’s the best. It’s hard to argue with what appears to be a high-touch approach. But argue I will.

Here are 4 reasons why telephonic coaching may be at least as good as face-to-face coaching:

  1. Telephonic coaching overcomes one of the primary barriers to participation. Employees have limited time, and convenience is everything. With telephonic coaching, they can participate whenever and wherever they want.
  2. Telephone conversations are not “disembodied voices.” If you don’t believe people can communicate effectively via the phone, will you also stand in the way of work-from-home arrangements, mhealth and telemedicine, and even conference calls? To take full advantage of the technologies of the present and future, we’ll need to let go of our old ways of looking at them.
  3. Face-to-face coaching can be woefully expensive and inefficient. In most cases, face-to-face coaching simply is not feasible for employers that have employees dispersed over large geographical regions.
  4. Employees demand and deserve privacy. If you’re an employer with a lot of extra configurable space, you may be able to devise the level of privacy employees demand, in which they cannot be overheard by co-workers, nor will coworkers even see them enter or exit the coach’s workspace. But can you match the level of employees can establish when they call a coach from the comfort of their home or office?

I don’t want to go overboard and try to claim that telephonic coaching is better than face-to-face. Most likely, the situation differs depending on the organization and the individual employee, and the ideal is to offer multiple options to each. But, as employee wellness continues to drive most of its initiatives based on intuition and pseudoscience, I simply want to caution against assuming that telephonic coaching is in some way inferior to face-to-face coaching.

If you’re still not convinced, here are some studies that support the case: