2020’s Trends and Transactions Foretell the Wellness Industry’s Future

in business, Employee Wellness Programs, Uncategorized, Wellbeing

Work-from-home, social connection, telehealth, social justice, mental health… and, of course, the COVID-19 disease itself have been the hot topics of 2020 in the employee wellbeing world.

Meanwhile, the US wellness industry — the business of employee wellbeing — grinds on, with a slew of trends and transactions that foretell its future. Here, I’ve summarized the commercial patterns and milestones that signal which doors are closing and which may open. Continue reading »

In the Aura of the Wellness Microcosm

in Employee Wellness Programs, Uncategorized, Wellbeing

Abstract image suggesting insightI don’t agree with everything in The Hard Problems of Corporate Wellness, including the premise that wellness hasn’t worked. But I’m grateful as all get-out that my friend and colleague Scott Dinwiddie is saying it. We don’t all need to agree, but we progress only by questioning the status quo, engaging in civil dialog, and seeking better solutions.

If we’re inclined to look, in this article we find wellbeing as a microcosm for the human condition. In fact, Scott’s exploration of personal accountability in the context of systemic disorder may shine a light on social issues that appropriately preoccupy us today.

In the aura of this microcosm, we in the wellness profession are called upon to renew our own personal sense of purpose.

Why We Love Ruthless HR Execs

in Uncategorized

The vendor blog post “Why We Love Patty McCord” perpetuates the cult-like status of an HR exec who made a name for herself blurring the lines between leading with transparency and leading with fear. Early on, the blog post proclaims that great workplace culture “requires companies to show employees they care.” 

Another worthwhile read, which lends insight into why the aforementioned exec was fired (falling victim to the consequences of the culture she fomented), is “Working at Netflix Sounds Absolutely Terrifying.” The exec, this article reports, left a legacy of a “harsh, hyper-competitive office culture.” This is the same exec the “great caring culture” vendor says “we love.”

Do the simplistic platitudes that permeate our discussions of corporate culture enable workplaces to cloak ruthlessness as transparency?

Employees with Mental Illness: Too Many To Be Obscured

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing

The National Institute of Mental Health reports that 20% of people live with a mental illness.

past year prevalence of Any Mental Illness among U.S. adults

Mental and behavioral disorders are the 3rd-leading cause of disability in the U.S. That’s a lot and warrants special attention.

Chart of the leading causes of disability, showing mental and behavioral health as the 3rd leading cause

Not everyone recovers from mental illness. Many (here, I don’t have stats, but the 20% figure  —  and my own observations  —  suggests this is true), suffer their entire lives with mental illness, and an increasing number of people end their lives as a result. Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. We need to help these people.

Mental health and emotional wellbeing, unquestionably, are important for everyone. But in the wellness industry’s well-meaning enthusiasm for covering everyone under the mental health umbrella, we must be sure not to marginalize the large portion of people experiencing mental illness.

If we do communicate that there’s no difference between someone with a common disabling mental illness  —  like PTSD, bipolar disorder, and anorexia nervosa, as well as severe depression and anxiety  —  compared to anyone else who may be going through a tough stretch in an otherwise smooth-sailing life, we risk perpetuating mental health stigma rather than alleviating it.

If you’re thinking about implementing a mental health strategy in your workplace, check out the Workplace Mental Health resources available here on the Jozito website.