Strawberries and workers

Photo by JD Hancock

Only about half of employers evaluate their employee wellness program’s effectiveness, so it may be time to own up to the possibility that you have no idea whether your program is helping or hurting, or whether anyone even knows you have a program. Or whether your company even knows it has you. That’s okay. You’re okay.

Here are 15 Do’s and Don’ts to help you rise out of the abyss of employee wellness mediocrity:

  1. Don’t:  Start with changing employees’ behaviors.
    Do: 
    Focus on changing your organization. Healthy employees require reasonable job demands, input regarding job demands, appropriate rewards, reasonable work schedules, fair treatment, empowerment, less work-life conflict, and more social support.
  2. Don’t: Expect your program to reduce health care costs. Most likely, it won’t.
    Do: Strive to support your employees’ wellness aspirations. Positive outcomes originate with your good intentions.
  3. Don’t: Encourage your employees to get annual screenings.  Screenings are probably one of the least cost-effective components of your program.
    Do: Offer your employees paid time off and good health insurance so they can get the care they need, when they need it.
  4. Don’t: Invest heavily in health incentives. Incentives don’t support behavior change, and may stand in the way.
    Do: Offer wellness programs and opportunities employees want.
  5. Don’t:  Get caught up in language: “Wellness” vs. “well-being”; “return-on-investment” vs. “value-on-investment”; “health risk appraisal” vs. “health assessment.” Not only are these sideshows, but in most of these debates, the wellness industry is settling for the less specific — hence, less measurable — option. That said…
    Do:  Distinguish between “participation” and “engagement.” To use them synonymously is downright fraudulent. Especially: If you have incentives, you have unengaged participation.
  6. Don’t:  Call your health surveillance program an “outcomes-based wellness program.” It gives a bad name to those of us, and those employers, who truly care about worker wellness.
    Do:  Speak out — in professional networks, on social media, at conferences, in journals, and in your company — against the scourge of “outcomes-based wellness.” If you don’t stand up to protect employees from mercenaries trying to pass off discriminatory tactics as “wellness,” who will?
  7. Don’t:  Try to address all the dimensions of wellness.
    Do:  Pursue those dimensions of wellness that employees want addressed, that they will respond to, and that are actionable by and meaningful to your organization. (The dimensions of wellness — physical health, emotional health, spiritual health, financial health, occupational health, environmental health, relationship health, and so forth — are interdependent. When you influence one, you’ll influence others.)
  8. Don’t:  Rely on wellness committees to do the work. You don’t use committees to run your other employee benefits or your total rewards programs, do you?
    Do:  Hire qualified professionals to do the work.
  9. Don’t:  Do something just because you heard about it at a conference.
    Do:  Avoid insularity by attending wellness conferences and conferences focusing on unrelated industries.
  10. Don’t:  Limit yourself to the conventional American perspective on wellness.
    Do:  Read the World Health Organization Healthy Workplace Framework and also RWJF’s Work, Workplaces and Health. (They make scant mention of biometric screenings, health risk assessments, incentives, coaching, apps, portals, or wearables.)
  11. Don’t:  Fret about what external critics think.
    Do:  Define a clear goal and measure progress toward achieving it. Satisfy the needs of the organization.
  12. Don’t:  Expect much from your health risk assessment. It’s outdated and was never an effective catalyst for behavioral change.
    Do:  Leverage your aggregate health risk assessment data as a tool to assess how you’re doing and how you can most effectively serve employees.
  13. Don’t:  Obsess over obesity in the absence of population-based solutions.
    Do:  Provide employees with delicious, fresh, whole food, when it’s necessary to provide food, and with opportunities to move.
  14. Don’t:  Get preoccupied with employees’ families. They don’t want you messing in their business.
    Do:  Get preoccupied with the health of the community you are in. They do want you messing in their business, and you’ll stand to affect employees and their families in the process.
  15. Don’t:  Take it from me…
    Do:  Seek diverse sources of evidence and opinion, and draw your own conclusions.
    ……

[15 Do-This-Not-Thats to Transform Your Wellness Program Into a Recruitment, Retention, Engagement, and Productivity Health-a-Palooza was originally published on the InTEWN blog, April 2015. Some of the links have been updated]