Supporting worker sleep is good for business

in total worker health, Uncategorized, job design, job strain, industrial organizational psychology
Don’t sleep on the job.
Matthew Jacques/Shutterstock.com

Leslie Hammer, Oregon Health & Science University and Lindsey Alley, Oregon Health & Science University

A long-haul truck driver fell asleep during his shift in Sunbury, Pennsylvania, on Jan. 13. Heading north on Route 147, he drifted into the eastbound shoulder for almost 375 feet, struck the side of the road and flipped his rig. Thankfully, the driver only suffered a minor injury and nobody else was harmed.

Poor sleep affects up to 70% of Americans and increases the risk of shortened lifespan and death. This includes deaths and injuries related to road accidents, stroke and reduced cardiovascular health. Continue reading »

Research: Stable Work Scheduling Succeeds; Behavior Change… Not So Much

in total worker health, Uncategorized, Wellbeing, job design

In the early going, a typical employee wellness program doesn’t have much impact on healthcare costs, health, quality of life, or job performance. This, based on data from a cluster-randomized study of employee wellness at BJ’s Wholesale stores. (Cluster randomization means the worksites, not the individual participants, were randomized.) Get the lowdown in my article, The 4 Factiest Facts Overlooked in the Latest Wellness Study Kerfuffle.

But rumors of wellbeing’s demise have been greatly exaggerated. A cluster-randomized study of Gap stores showed that stabilizing worker schedules led to increased sales and — while it’s no panacea — enhanced employee wellbeing, especially sleep. (A separate major study confirmed that unstable schedules are strongly linked — more strongly even than low wages — to workers’ psychological distress, sleep disruption, and unhappiness.) The contrasting results from these studies, building on previous research, surely will persuade business leaders to prioritize organizational strategies over health behavior modification products.

Stable schedule infographic

Beware of Running with the Wellness Herd

in Uncategorized, Commentary

Like many industries, we in the wellness biz tend to run with the herd. A few years ago, all we could talk about was mindfulness. Then we veered toward resilience. Last year, financial wellness was the buzzword. This year, the herd must be getting tired, as we switch direction toward…sleep.

Sleep loss and its cost to business are hot topics these days. Employee Benefit News recently published an article titled, Companies Can’t Afford to Ignore Sleep in Wellness Offerings. Fast Company published Your Employees’ Sleep Problems Are Costing Your Business Time And Money. The Institute of Health and Productivity Management created its Sleep Health and Wellness division, to be introduced with a day-long conference. And a book, Work and Sleep, will be published next month and will draw additional attention to workers’ sleep loss.

New sleep program providers are cropping up, and existing wellness vendors are waking up to the opportunity to hop on the bandwagon.

Don’t get me wrong. Mindfulness, resilience, financial wellness, and sleep are important.

herd

And I’m not saying that none of us have run against the herd by addressing these topics before they got trendy or supporting employee wellbeing in innovative ways. But, in general, our industry flits from one topic to another, from one tactic to another, falling in line with our herd’s stampede. The risk is that workers get trampled in the process.

One key to sustaining established wellness efforts, rather than letting the sun set on last year’s program as dawn breaks on this year’s, is to strategically scale up the size of the team that operationalizes these efforts. In other words — to use the term HR has eerily adapted from cattle ranchers — “add headcount.” Expand resources in proportion to demands? What a concept.

Despite my earlier acknowledgment  that our herd mentality is comparable to other industries’, there is a difference: Other industries — especially those that are consumer-oriented — respond to changes in demand: Cold-pressed juice with chia one day, probiotics the next. Fuel-efficient cars one year, technology packages the next.

What drives our wellness herd?

As our newfound devotion to employee sleep takes hold this year, I suspect our herders may be revealed to us if we  keep an eye on who is sponsoring the events, the publications, and the research that promotes it. There, the presence of vendors and pharmaceutical companies, for example, wouldn’t invalidate sleep as an important issue for employees, but it seems unlikely to serve as a sustainable driver of a successful long-term employee wellbeing strategy.