Podcast: Wellness, Job Insecurity, Unemployment, and Authenticity

in Uncategorized, job strain, industrial organizational psychology

This episode of the Redesigning Wellness podcast (below) is brilliant. Kudos to Chrissy Ball, Michelle Bartelt, and Scott Dinwiddie for having the courage to share their experiences and feelings around job loss. Thank you Jen Arnold for organizing and facilitating a bold conversation.

My take: As much as we wellness pros talk about “authenticity,” we rarely display it. Perhaps we feel obligated to project a veneer of exuberance. Indeed, this often seems to be expected. (I had a boss lament that she’d always imagined her wellness director would be “peppy” — which I proudly am not.) These panelists model real wellbeing as they describe hard times — anger, sadness, fear, and separation (as well as resilience, connection, and growth).

This conversation reminds us of the psychosocial influences on wellbeing that too often are obscured by our preoccupation with behavior change. Key amongst these is *job security*, as well as employment itself and role identity.

As we listen, we’ll do well to think of workers who are struggling — single parents, folks living on the poverty line, et al — and how their wellbeing is threatened by job insecurity and unemployment. How can we, as wellbeing leaders, help?

225: Job Loss During a Pandemic with Chrissy Ball, Michelle Bartelt, and Scott Dinwiddie

In the Aura of the Wellness Microcosm

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing, Employee Wellness Programs

Abstract image suggesting insightI don’t agree with everything in The Hard Problems of Corporate Wellness, including the premise that wellness hasn’t worked. But I’m grateful as all get-out that my friend and colleague Scott Dinwiddie is saying it. We don’t all need to agree, but we progress only by questioning the status quo, engaging in civil dialog, and seeking better solutions.

If we’re inclined to look, in this article we find wellbeing as a microcosm for the human condition. In fact, Scott’s exploration of personal accountability in the context of systemic disorder may shine a light on social issues that appropriately preoccupy us today.

In the aura of this microcosm, we in the wellness profession are called upon to renew our own personal sense of purpose.

Employee Experience Rises

in Uncategorized

sunrise with hot air balloons, to depict employee experience rising

In the seminal article, Employee Experience is the Operating System for Wellness 2.0, Scott Dinwiddie breathes meaning into the concept of employee experience (EX) — employee-centered, adding purpose, facilitating value creation, and offering environments and cultures that support wellbeing.

With its clear vision and unabashed call-to-action, this article is a must-read for anyone interested in employee experience (as well as wellness, engagement, and business success).

I was honored to be recognized in the article, and especially privileged to be included among the other distinguished colleagues whose work Scott referenced.