There’s Mental Health in Them Thar Workers

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing, Workplace Mental Health Resources

woman with gold face

In the red-hot employee mental health industry, two of the reddest, hottest companies — Ginger and Headspace — announced their merger. As reported by Stat:

The new company, called Headspace Health, will have a reported value of $3 billion, placing it in the top echelon of companies vying to own significant chunks of the mental health market….Headspace, which sells directly to consumers as well as to businesses, is focused on self-directed meditation and mindfulness…Ginger also offers self-guided treatment in addition to text-based coaching and video-based therapy and psychiatry.

Oliver Harrison, CEO of digital mental health competitor Koa Health, magnanimously blogged that the merger represents “a tremendous moment signaling the growing market demand, innovation and transformation for digital mental health and wellbeing.”

This might be true, but we might also conclude that this is a moment in which two unrelenting enterprises join forces to, as Stat said, “own chunks of the market.”

Innovation? Later in the post, Harrison quotes HR expert Josh Bersin:

“Bigger companies with thousands of customers try to innovate, but the demands of their large, existing customers distract their engineering teams and they can rarely innovate like they did when they were small.”

A colleague recently described employee mental health as a modern day gold rush, with money gushing into it from exuberant employers — clawing for precious solutions, while surrounded by barkers hawking unauthenticated replicas — and venture capitalist prospectors jumping aboard the gravy train.

Tremendous Moment? Or Wild West?

Headspace and Ginger are joining hands as they stake their claim in the mental health landscape. Good for them. We can only hope it also turns out to be good for care seekers, employers, and mental health in general.

In other news, in-person therapy is now available at Walmart. Find it somewhere between the ammo, tobacco products, and baby strollers.


“Gold face” image courtesy John Vasilopoulos via Pixabay.com, https://pixabay.com/users/sjv_john-9645453/

Mental Health First Aid — Q & A with Bob Merberg, MHFA Instructor

in Mental Health First Aid, Uncategorized
Photo by Bruno Scramgnon from Pexels

Near the end of our 2020 Wrap-Up on the Redesigning Wellness podcast, host Jen Arnold asks me about Jozito LLC’s plans for 2021, which gave me a chance to explain how employers can offer Mental Health First Aid training to support their leaders, managers, and workforce at large. The section starts around minute 52:00 (the YouTube version below should go right there). And, below, I’ve provided a summary (adapted from the podcast), in question and answer format. Continue reading »

Why Does My Organization Need Mental Health First Aid Training?

in Featured, Mental Health First Aid, Uncategorized

Mental Health First Aid logoSince I first discovered Mental Health First Aid a few years ago, I’ve recognized it as an ideal cornerstone of any organization’s employee mental health strategy. As an interactive face-to-face program, it’s a much needed foundation for digital mental health solutions and other remote services. It’s a surefire way, in fact, to increase awareness and use of mental health benefits, like the often under-utilized employee assistance programs. Help employees get the support they need…when they need it.

I’ve advised most of my employer clients to offer Mental Health First Aid training — to their managers or their entire workforce — and now I’m thrilled to announce that, as a certified Mental Health First Aid instructor, I’ll deliver this training myself. Use this website’s Contact form for more info about how Mental Health First Aid will boost your employees’ wellbeing and, consequently, your organization’s performance. Continue reading »

My 2 Biggest Employee Mental Health Flops

in Stress, Uncategorized, Wellbeing

What Were You Thinking?

Podcast interviewers and conference organizers often ask me to talk about my mistakes and failures. Thank you very much.

It’s okay; I get it. Others can learn from our mistakes and also take solace in the fact that we all make them. Listening to some presenter prattle on about how perfect their programs are  especially when they’re from companies with nearly unlimited resources  can be discouraging rather than inspiring. (Besides, if our professional social media is pervaded exclusively by self-promotion and ungrounded thought leadership, it’s hard to grow in a way that’s relevant to the real-life work environment.)

For some reason, two of my professional flops fell in the realms of mental health and emotional well-being. Continue reading »