Finding sexual misconduct and harassment beneath a veneer of psychological safety

A recent Fast Company article gushes about a particular company’s culture of psychological safety — that is, its “employees’ ability to take risks without feeling insecure or embarrassed.”

Really?

This is a company about which the Department of Labor once said, “Discrimination against women…is quite extreme.”

A New York Times article recently revealed that the company has protected, arguably even rewarded, executives accused of sexual misconduct. It described one exec who “often berated subordinates as stupid or incompetent.” The company “did little to curb that behavior.”

A screenshot the exec’s ex-wife included in a lawsuit, according to the Times, showed an email he sent to another woman: “You will be happy being taken care of,” he wrote. “Being owned is kinda like you are my property, and I can loan you to other people.”

In our quest for a psychological-safety poster child, we may need to conduct a better search.

Sexual misconduct and harassment