Non-Denominational: COVID Study Screws Up Mortality Data. Media Follows Suit.

in Data, Uncategorized
Fraction with x numerator and y denominatorA headline in the Washington Post (April 26, 2020), based on the researchers’ conclusions at the time, blared, “In New York’s largest hospital system, 88% of coronavirus patients on ventilators didn’t make it.” (As of April 25, the headline wasn’t corrected. By May 5, it had been changed to read “…many patients on ventilators didn’t make it.”)

The ventilator mortality rate excluded from the denominator patients still in the hospital.

After an immediate outcry from others in the medical community, the research paper was corrected in JAMA online:
“The sentence reporting mortality for patients receiving mechanical ventilation should read, ‘As of April 4, 2020, for patients requiring mechanical ventilation (n = 1151, 20.2%), 38 (3.3%) were discharged alive, 282 (24.5%) died, and 831 (72.2%) remained in hospital.'”
This is one example  —  the cornovirus pandemic has provided many  —  of the importance of proper denominators.
Denominators often are not scrutinized closely enough by journalists, by businesses, or by wellness professionals. The gross oversight described here reminds us that, without any background in statistics or data science, denominators used in calculations  —  when, indeed, they are used  —  are one reasonable starting point (population size is another) when interpreting data.

Hire Based on Facts, Not Feels

in Data, Uncategorized, industrial organizational psychology

a heart, symbolizing the error of hiring job candidates based on subjective observations and feelingsIs it enough for a job candidate to “show up” for an interview?

A prominent voice on LinkedIn recently garnered more than 17,000 likes with a post that read, in part:

We just hired a Gen-Z candidate with zero experience. Here’s why… They arrived 10 min early for their morning interview (respect ✊), pronounced my name correctly (major kudos), had a firm handshake, dressed sharp, and brought a hard copy of their resume (I didn’t need it). During the interview they smiled, made eye contact, and were honest about having zero experience (we value honesty). They asked me questions, they wanted to learn, they showed up! To all the hiring decision makers out there, don’t disqualify candidates because they don’t have “experience.”

By all means, don’t discriminate against Gen-Z or any other Gen, or against candidates who don’t have experience if the job doesn’t require it. But be smart about hiring, based on Continue reading »

Don’t Get Left Behind By People Analytics

in Data

Employers are getting serious about HR Analytics (aka People Analytics). At the same time, many of our wellness industry colleagues demonize data, often cloaking their anxieties behind advocacy of humanization

We’ll hear wellness leaders denigrate data because, for example, “it reduces people to numbers” (which could be the slogan for the International Society of Dataphobes).

But if we let our fears, insecurities, or aversions get the better of us, resisting data as a primary language of business, we’ll get left behind in a world where employers, even their HR departments, increasingly see the promise of analytics. Continue reading »

What Works: CDC Survey Provides Context for Controversial Wellness Studies

in Data, total worker health, Uncategorized, Employee Wellness Programs

Context iconThe BJ’s Wholesale Club study wasn’t the most important employee wellness research published last month. Let’s look at the Workplace Health in America Survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

When you put the CDC survey together with BJ’s Wholesale Club research as well as last year’s Illinois University worksite wellness study (both employers found that 12-18 months of wellness programming didn’t reduce healthcare costs or improve productivity) we get a more complete picture of relevance.

The CDC asked about companies’ employee health promotion programs. 2,843 respondents completed surveys — targeting whoever in the company was most knowledgeable about its wellness offerings — from a variety of employers.

Here’s some of what the survey found: Continue reading »