Get the Facts: University of Illinois’ Randomized Controlled Study of an Employee Wellness Program

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing, Employee Wellness Programs

dice suggesting randomized controlled trial

In her incisive Redesigning Wellness interview with Julian Reif (principal investigator of the Illinois Workplace Wellness Study), Jen Arnold elicits answers to controversial questions like how the research team defined “comprehensive program” and why they believe their randomized study design “cancels out” most previous wellness program study findings.

Thanks Jen (and thank you for the shout-outs), and thank you, Julian Reif.

Essential listening for wellness leaders who care about results. Click below to go to the podcast episode page:

198: Research on the Effectiveness of Traditional Wellness Programs with Julian Reif, Assistant Professor of Finance and Economics at the University of Illinois

In the Aura of the Wellness Microcosm

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing, Employee Wellness Programs

Abstract image suggesting insightI don’t agree with everything in The Hard Problems of Corporate Wellness, including the premise that wellness hasn’t worked. But I’m grateful as all get-out that my friend and colleague Scott Dinwiddie is saying it. We don’t all need to agree, but we progress only by questioning the status quo, engaging in civil dialog, and seeking better solutions.

If we’re inclined to look, in this article we find wellbeing as a microcosm for the human condition. In fact, Scott’s exploration of personal accountability in the context of systemic disorder may shine a light on social issues that appropriately preoccupy us today.

In the aura of this microcosm, we in the wellness profession are called upon to renew our own personal sense of purpose.

20 Years! Congratulations to Wellcoaches and the Wellness Coaches They’ve Trained!

in Uncategorized

The number 20  —  a milestone

Check out Margaret Moore’s post, 20 Years to a Vision with Wings, chronicling the path of Wellcoaches Corporation (and wellness coaching) leading up to the organization’s 20-year anniversary.

I’m honored that Margaret, Wellcoaches Founder and CEO, included me amongst the founders of the wellness coaching field, and especially honored to be associated with the other distinguished innovators she mentions:

Our inspiring fellow founders of the field we now call health & wellness coaching included Sean Slovenski, Bob Merberg, Michael Arloski, and Linda Bark.

Congratulations to Margaret, Wellcoaches, and the 12,000 coaches they’ve trained across the globe, who over 20 years have shaped the field that has benefited the wellbeing of so many!

Surveys: When the Mean Lacks Meaning

in Data, Uncategorized

survey

Got this survey question from an employee wellness organization:

Are you worried about you or your employees contracting Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

1. Not worried

2.

3. Worried

4.

5. Very worried

There’s a fundamental flaw with how the question is constructed. Suppose you’re very worried about your employees getting COVID-19, but not worried about getting it yourself. How would you answer this survey item, which combines both questions into one? We should only ask one question… per question.

This also may serve as an example of how Likert scales can be poorly applied. Likert midpoints, when used, usually represent a neutral response (in this case, answer number 3 would be something like “Neither worried or unworried,” or a better option — since it may not be possible to be neither worried or unworried — may have been to include an even number of response choices with no midpoint).

Here, the survey providers essentially offer 4 levels of worry and 1 level of not-worried. They might be able to adjust for this in their analysis, but more typically survey providers generate a mean average score, which will be meaningless in this non-linear scale.

This reinforces what most of us have learned about survey design, and serves as a reminder to consider, when we read results of surveys on important topics (like public health or employer sentiment), how the data was collected.

Non-Denominational: COVID Study Screws Up Mortality Data. Media Follows Suit.

in Data, Uncategorized
Fraction with x numerator and y denominatorA headline in the Washington Post (April 26, 2020), based on the researchers’ conclusions at the time, blared, “In New York’s largest hospital system, 88% of coronavirus patients on ventilators didn’t make it.” (As of April 25, the headline wasn’t corrected. By May 5, it had been changed to read “…many patients on ventilators didn’t make it.”)

The ventilator mortality rate excluded from the denominator patients still in the hospital.

After an immediate outcry from others in the medical community, the research paper was corrected in JAMA online:
“The sentence reporting mortality for patients receiving mechanical ventilation should read, ‘As of April 4, 2020, for patients requiring mechanical ventilation (n = 1151, 20.2%), 38 (3.3%) were discharged alive, 282 (24.5%) died, and 831 (72.2%) remained in hospital.'”
This is one example  —  the cornovirus pandemic has provided many  —  of the importance of proper denominators.
Denominators often are not scrutinized closely enough by journalists, by businesses, or by wellness professionals. The gross oversight described here reminds us that, without any background in statistics or data science, denominators used in calculations  —  when, indeed, they are used  —  are one reasonable starting point (population size is another) when interpreting data.

Employee Well-being, COVID-19, and the Future of Work

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing, Featured

Bus driver during COVID-19 (coronavirus) epidemicI don’t know what’s going to happen to the economy or what course the coronavirus pandemic will take. But I’ve had time to reflect on what a new world order may mean for employee wellness and the future of work.

Here are 10 hopes, fears, and questions (not predictions):

1) We’ll re-frame “meaningful work” — I recently heard, in an interview, a worker who delivers tortillas to grocery stores poignantly articulate what will prevail as a fresh take on meaning and work: Continue reading »

Make Change Happen with Rob Baker’s “Personalization at Work: How HR Can Use Job Crafting, to Drive Performance, Engagement and Wellbeing”

in job design, job crafting

Book cover: Personalization at Work — How HR Can Use Job Crafting to Drive Performance, Engagement And WellbeingI may not know the future of coronavirus or the future of the economy (see my previous post with 10 non-predictions about COVID, wellness, and the future of work), but one thing I feel certain about is that the future of work will be personalized. Business demands will require it. As such, I’m proud to offer an unpaid and wholehearted endorsement of the just published book Personalization at Work: How HR Can Use Job Crafting, to Drive Performance, Engagement and Wellbeing, by my friend and colleague Rob Baker. I just finished the book and it has already changed the way I work.

As Adam Grant said,

Job crafting is a skill every employee needs and every manager should value. This is the first book to bring research and practice together in an engaging way for HR professionals.,

HES Unveils “Work of Art”

in Wellbeing

Work of Art LogoJozito’s Bob Merberg Served As Key Consultant For Innovative Emotional Well-Being Program

MindfulnessGratitudeOptimismConnection, and more.

The Art of Living an Emotionally Healthy Life

I’m delighted to tell you about a solution to an employee well-being gap I’ve written about often — a solution just announced by my client, Health Enhancement Systems (HES)…

Work of Art is a program about the art of living an emotionally healthy life, featuring the personalizationquality, and spirit that only HES can deliver. As a consultant on the product, playing a major role with background research, content development, testing, and some feature design, the release of Work of Art — a program I’m certain will make a difference in the lives of workers and the organizations that employ them — is one of the proudest milestones of my career.

I urge you to learn more about Work of Art, and to pass this message along to your colleagues, because it may just be the most important employee wellbeing product of its time.

Gratitude to Treat Mental Illness? Thank You, But No Thank You

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing

A new study repudiates gratitude interventions as a treatment for depression.

The original intention of positive psychology was to expand mental health, not to cure mental illness. But wannabes self-help gurus, and some mental health professionals, hawk positive psychology interventions as a panacea for clinical disorders.

As the study authors note, gratitude interventions have value (for example, improving relationships) —  but not much for the treatment of depression or anxiety.

Ultimately, the authors state (in Gratitude Interventions: Effective Self-help? A Meta-analysis of the Impact on Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety):

Consistent with past reviews, we found gratitude interventions had a medium effect when compared with waitlist-only conditions, but only a trivial effect when compared with putatively inert control conditions involving any kind of activity.

In other words, gratitude interventions didn’t fair better than other behavioral activities used as controls.

A remaining controversy is how the limited efficacy of gratitude interventions compares to popular antidepressant medications.

Here’s Why Payday Is Obsolete in the Future of Work

in Uncategorized

Clock and money represent real-time payrollIn the age of Venmo and Zelle, it’s clear that “payday” will be obsolete in the future of work  —  the near future. Several new fintech companies provide employers with real-time payroll services, and the big legacy payroll companies are close behind.

Withholding earned pay for 2-week or 1-month “pay periods” is a vestige of days gone by, serving the funds-holder but penalizing the earner.

While some companies already have introduced on-time (on-time = real-time) payment as an opt-in service paid for by employees and/or their employers, it inevitably will become the standard. This is an important option to be considered by employers genuinely committed to their employees’ financial wellness. But it only makes sense if the employees incur no fees. Employers generally don’t charge employees for other payroll services, just as they don’t return dividends to employees when they’ve managed to realize savings (say, through increased payroll system efficiencies, contracting with more cost-effective providers, and so forth.)

There is a cost… in service provider fees and the loss of “float”  (the interest employers earn on the money they’re withholding — big money, especially during periods of higher interest rates). This needs to be built into employers’ financial models.

Supporting worker sleep is good for business

in total worker health, Uncategorized, job design, job strain, industrial organizational psychology
Don’t sleep on the job.
Matthew Jacques/Shutterstock.com

Leslie Hammer, Oregon Health & Science University and Lindsey Alley, Oregon Health & Science University

A long-haul truck driver fell asleep during his shift in Sunbury, Pennsylvania, on Jan. 13. Heading north on Route 147, he drifted into the eastbound shoulder for almost 375 feet, struck the side of the road and flipped his rig. Thankfully, the driver only suffered a minor injury and nobody else was harmed.

Poor sleep affects up to 70% of Americans and increases the risk of shortened lifespan and death. This includes deaths and injuries related to road accidents, stroke and reduced cardiovascular health. Continue reading »

Employee Experience Rises

in Uncategorized

sunrise with hot air balloons, to depict employee experience rising

In the seminal article, Employee Experience is the Operating System for Wellness 2.0, Scott Dinwiddie breathes meaning into the concept of employee experience (EX) — employee-centered, adding purpose, facilitating value creation, and offering environments and cultures that support wellbeing.

With its clear vision and unabashed call-to-action, this article is a must-read for anyone interested in employee experience (as well as wellness, engagement, and business success).

I was honored to be recognized in the article, and especially privileged to be included among the other distinguished colleagues whose work Scott referenced.

Launching Vendor Apps and Websites: 8 Lessons from the Iowa Caucuses

in Uncategorized, Employee Wellness Programs

8 lessons from the 2020 Iowa caucuses… for Wellness, HR, and Employee Benefits Managers launching new apps/websites:

  1. Conduct your due diligence with the vendor. Find and talk to the vendor’s ex-clients — not just the references provided to you. Visit the vendor’s offices (i.e. site visits), when possible.
  2. Attach steep performance guarantees to implementation. Look for at least 10-15% of the first year’s total fees. You only get one chance for a smooth launch. If the vendor balks, they’re telling you they don’t have confidence in their capabilities. Consider metrics like launch-date readiness, uptime, loading speed, speed to answer help desk calls and to reply to emails, and participant satisfaction (measured by you, not the vendor) with the initial process. As usual, you don’t want to have to collect these performance guarantee fees. You do want the vendor to be motivated and accountable. Of course, you can only hold them accountable for things in their control.
  3. Test, test, and test again. Test as many scenarios (different kinds of users; different ways of using the technology; etc.) as possible.
  4. During implementation, require regular updates on your vendor’s quality assurance processes.
  5. Have an experienced project manager on your team, and an IT specialist who has access to the vendor’s IT team. Include other experts, as needed, and work within your organization to assure selected team members are fully engaged in the project, and not just begrudgingly doing something they consider outside their job responsibilities.
  6. Collaborate with your vendor on systematic pre-launch training of key managers, leaders, and team members in your organization.
  7. Require your vendor to identify an executive sponsor for your account — a leader on their team with whom you can establish a relationship and who will make sure the vendor’s organizational barriers are torn down when you need them to mobilize for action on your organization’s behalf.
  8. Don’t scapegoat your vendor. When things don’t go well, look at your own performance and your organization to identify opportunities for improvement. (When things do go well, give credit where credit is due.)

Why We Love Ruthless HR Execs

in Uncategorized

The vendor blog post “Why We Love Patty McCord” perpetuates the cult-like status of an HR exec who made a name for herself blurring the lines between leading with transparency and leading with fear. Early on, the blog post proclaims that great workplace culture “requires companies to show employees they care.” 

Another worthwhile read, which lends insight into why the aforementioned exec was fired (falling victim to the consequences of the culture she fomented), is “Working at Netflix Sounds Absolutely Terrifying.” The exec, this article reports, left a legacy of a “harsh, hyper-competitive office culture.” This is the same exec the “great caring culture” vendor says “we love.”

Do the simplistic platitudes that permeate our discussions of corporate culture enable workplaces to cloak ruthlessness as transparency?

Hire Based on Facts, Not Feels

in Data, Uncategorized, industrial organizational psychology

a heart, symbolizing the error of hiring job candidates based on subjective observations and feelingsIs it enough for a job candidate to “show up” for an interview?

A prominent voice on LinkedIn recently garnered more than 17,000 likes with a post that read, in part:

We just hired a Gen-Z candidate with zero experience. Here’s why… They arrived 10 min early for their morning interview (respect ✊), pronounced my name correctly (major kudos), had a firm handshake, dressed sharp, and brought a hard copy of their resume (I didn’t need it). During the interview they smiled, made eye contact, and were honest about having zero experience (we value honesty). They asked me questions, they wanted to learn, they showed up! To all the hiring decision makers out there, don’t disqualify candidates because they don’t have “experience.”

By all means, don’t discriminate against Gen-Z or any other Gen, or against candidates who don’t have experience if the job doesn’t require it. But be smart about hiring, based on Continue reading »

The Worst of Times, The Best of Times for Financial Wellbeing

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing

A man giving or taking money

In 2019, employees filed a class action lawsuit against a prominent employer for allegedly selling out its workers’ 401(k), costing the plan tens of millions of dollars in excess fees and underperformance, in exchange for mega-donations and lavish personal gifts. These shady dealings with employees’ savings were being finagled at the same time financial wellness program promotions admonished employees to “understand their values and get their finances in order.” (Learn more in my Financial Whatness? article.)

On the other hand, Dan Price of Gravity Payments, who, in 2015 raised his company’s minimum wage to $70,000 per year while slashing his own salary, launched a plan in 2019 to establish the same healthy wage for employees of a new acquisition in Boise, Idaho. Mr. Price has his naysayers, but you’ll be convinced he understands his values when it comes to employee wellbeing — financial and otherwise — after you listen to this interview:

S4 EP13: The CEO Who Radically Cut His Pay to Give His Employees a Radical Raise

Getting Jerky About Nutritional Advice

in Uncategorized

flying pigJust when you were getting on board with a plant-based diet comes a new, supposedly more rigorous analysis by 14 researchers, saying it’s fine (nutritionally) to eat red meat, even processed meats like bacon. The new analysis argued that previous studies were either biased by veggie-lovin’ diehards and food industry shills or simply weren’t rigorous enough.

But wait… what’s this?! Just when you thought it was safe to go back to the deli, it turns out the lead author of the new analysis had previous ties to the meat and food industry.

This type of shenanigans is why I refrain from engaging in nutritional advice. We really understand little about the health effects of specific foods and nutrients.

 

I’m OK — You’re #OKBoomer

in Uncategorized

Browse the nearly 100 blog posts I’ve published on my website and you’ll find no mention of millennials — because generational stereotypes have limited validity and are just another way to pigeonhole folks. So, while I can understand the backlash that may have led to 2019’s patronizing #OKBoomer meme, it ultimately serves only to perpetuate polarization.

OKBoomer may lead to some age discrimination lawsuits, or it may just be a soon-to-be-forgotten fad. Either way, it can serve as a reminder for each of us to embrace diversity, inclusion, and connectedness, in all their forms.

Research: Stable Work Scheduling Succeeds; Behavior Change… Not So Much

in total worker health, Uncategorized, Wellbeing, job design

In the early going, a typical employee wellness program doesn’t have much impact on healthcare costs, health, quality of life, or job performance. This, based on data from a cluster-randomized study of employee wellness at BJ’s Wholesale stores. (Cluster randomization means the worksites, not the individual participants, were randomized.) Get the lowdown in my article, The 4 Factiest Facts Overlooked in the Latest Wellness Study Kerfuffle.

But rumors of wellbeing’s demise have been greatly exaggerated. A cluster-randomized study of Gap stores showed that stabilizing worker schedules led to increased sales and — while it’s no panacea — enhanced employee wellbeing, especially sleep. (A separate major study confirmed that unstable schedules are strongly linked — more strongly even than low wages — to workers’ psychological distress, sleep disruption, and unhappiness.) The contrasting results from these studies, building on previous research, surely will persuade business leaders to prioritize organizational strategies over health behavior modification products.

Stable schedule infographic

“How To Dress and Act Nicely Around Men”

in Uncategorized

Science fiction -like image of a feminist

Japan’s #KuToo movement — from the words “kutsu” (shoes) and “kutsuu” (pain) — arose in response to dress codes requiring female workers to wear high heels, a workplace policy the Health and Labor Minister declared “occupationally necessary and appropriate.”

Similar requirements have ignited protests elsewhere.

Aside from the unabashed sexism these policies represent, even less woke old-school health promoters will be concerned about health risks linked to high heels. According to a report conducted for the UK Parliament, these include:

  • long-term changes to gait, which cause knee, hip and spine problems and osteoarthritis;
  • stress fractures in foot bones;
  • Morton’s neuroma;
  • ankle sprains, fractures and breakages due to trips and accidents;
  • hallux valgus (bunions);
  • blisters and skin lesions;
  • enduring balance problems which persist into old age;

The report also cited psychological distress reported by female workers who were required to wear high heels against their will.

Meanwhile, in the US, HuffPost exposed a prominent professional services firm that set us all back with one of its women’s leadership trainings. The training’s handbook insisted that “the most important thing women can do is ‘signal fitness and wellness.’” 🤮

It advised trainees to have a “good haircut, manicured nails, well-cut attire that complements your body type.” Then it warns:

“Don’t flaunt your body ― sexuality scrambles the mind (for men and women).”

Read the full HuffPo article and to view the employer’s “leaked” video response:

Women At Ernst & Young Instructed On How To Dress, Act Nicely Around Men

 

 

Employees with Mental Illness: Too Many To Be Obscured

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing

The National Institute of Mental Health reports that 20% of people live with a mental illness.

past year prevalence of Any Mental Illness among U.S. adults

Mental and behavioral disorders are the 3rd-leading cause of disability in the U.S. That’s a lot and warrants special attention.

Chart of the leading causes of disability, showing mental and behavioral health as the 3rd leading cause

Not everyone recovers from mental illness. Many (here, I don’t have stats, but the 20% figure  —  and my own observations  —  suggests this is true), suffer their entire lives with mental illness, and an increasing number of people end their lives as a result. Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. We need to help these people.

Mental health and emotional wellbeing, unquestionably, are important for everyone. But in the wellness industry’s well-meaning enthusiasm for covering everyone under the mental health umbrella, we must be sure not to marginalize the large portion of people experiencing mental illness.

If we do communicate that there’s no difference between someone with a common disabling mental illness  —  like PTSD, bipolar disorder, and anorexia nervosa, as well as severe depression and anxiety  —  compared to anyone else who may be going through a tough stretch in an otherwise smooth-sailing life, we risk perpetuating mental health stigma rather than alleviating it.

If you’re thinking about implementing a mental health strategy in your workplace, check out the Workplace Mental Health resources available here on the Jozito website.

Everyone Cheats? Step-Tracking and the “Privilege” of Higher Premiums

in Employee Wellness Programs

Hedgehog“Maybe you just want to keep your personal data private without having to pay higher premiums for the privilege.”

The article Everyone Cheats On Fitness Trackers makes some odd assertions, like, “This is seen as a win-win for insurers who want you to live longer, so you earn them more money.” But once the article gets going, it raises valid points and describes some amusing scenarios, like

“Making health a game of points means employees game the system right back, though they don’t all have hedgehogs.”

People ask me, “Yeah, but how small is the proportion of employees who cheat in step-tracking programs, and why should the majority of participants, who are honest, have to suffer the consequences?”

Experience suggests that the proportion of cheaters is not at all small (the headline of this article says “everyone”), though the construct of “cheating” is not always straightforward.

Cheating is especially likely when an incentive is offered. For one spectacular example, see my archived article Do Employees Cheat for Wellness Incentives?

 

 

 

 

Don’t Get Left Behind By People Analytics

in Data

Employers are getting serious about HR Analytics (aka People Analytics). At the same time, many of our wellness industry colleagues demonize data, often cloaking their anxieties behind advocacy of humanization

We’ll hear wellness leaders denigrate data because, for example, “it reduces people to numbers” (which could be the slogan for the International Society of Dataphobes).

But if we let our fears, insecurities, or aversions get the better of us, resisting data as a primary language of business, we’ll get left behind in a world where employers, even their HR departments, increasingly see the promise of analytics. Continue reading »

When Organizational Values Aren’t Values

in Uncategorized

Values
After her presentation at a wellness conference, a colleague reports, an attendee told her:

I never would have thought to align our wellness program with our core values and business goals.

If a wellness leader never would have thought to align the wellness program with the organization’s core values, they probably aren’t really core values. Continue reading »

Coming Soon: Rob Baker’s “Personalization at Work: How HR Can Use Job Crafting to Drive Performance, Engagement and Wellbeing”

in job design, industrial organizational psychology, job crafting

The book I’m most looking forward to in 2020:

Rob Baker’s…

Personalization at Work: How HR Can Use Job Crafting to Drive Performance, Engagement and Wellbeing

Rob and I talk frequently, and he’s strongly influenced my thinking and practices regarding job crafting.

10 Ideas for Your Workplace’s Financial Wellbeing Inventory

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing

inventory for financial wellnessYou know those organizational inventories we recommend for other dimensions of wellbeing? Before launching a physical wellness program, for example, we conduct audits of workplace factors that influence physical health, like pretty stairwells, healthy food in vending machines, and so forth. Before launching a culture-of-health strategy, we assess the current state of the organization’s culture, using criteria like “Is wellness mentioned in the company’s mission statement?” and “Does the CEO visibly model wellness behaviors?”

We should do the same with our ever-popular financial wellbeing strategies. Before launching strategies to promote savings, budgeting, debt management, and retirement planning, let’s assess Continue reading »

Our Usual Construct of Psychological Safety Isn’t Enough

in total worker health, burnout, job strain

woman in psychological distress

Gruesome. A worst case scenario that exemplifies why it’s not enough to view psychological safety as encouraging risk-taking and authenticity. We have to use what we know about workplace psychosocial risk factors — like organizational injustice, job insecurity, and social isolation — to prevent psychological injury.

Click on image or here to read the New York Times article, “35 Employees Committed Suicide. Will Their Bosses Go to Jail?

The 4 Steps Wellness Organizations Must Take to Move Our Industry Forward

in Uncategorized, Employee Wellness Programs, industrial organizational psychology

what's next for employee wellnessThis is based on a response I wrote to an astute new leader of a wellness industry organization who was asking, “What should be next for the organization to move wellness forward?”

  1. Broaden the base. Reach out to professionals trained in fields other than exercise, nutrition, and HR. Especially, bring in folks trained in the relatively fast-growing field of I/O Psychology, who have a deeper, evidence-based understanding of wellbeing and also tend to be well trained in analytics. Speaking of which…
  2. Train wellness professionals in analytics. HR finally seems to be getting serious about data, and wellness will be left behind if we don’t have stronger competency in this area. We don’t need to be data scientists, but we should be able to direct analytical work and speak the language. I’ve been studying statistics, business analytics, and advanced Excel, and it’s already added value for my clients.
  3. Help us understand the wellness needs of employees. Because wellness in the US has been market driven, we give most of our attention to what purchasers (employers) will buy, rather than what employees want. Unfortunately, these are rarely the same thing.
  4. Help identify and then advocate for where wellness fits in an organization. As long as we’re tucked away in benefits departments, we’ll be undervalued and weighed-down by healthcare cost-reduction fantasies.

The 4 Factiest Facts Overlooked in the Latest Wellness Study Kerfuffle

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing, Employee Wellness Programs

Skuffle cloud to represent wellness industry stakeholder dispute

A study of the BJ’s Wholesale Club employee wellness program attracted a lot of attention in the media, but the most important facts about the study were overlooked.

“The model aims to answer the question: what is the effect of offering an individual the opportunity to participate in a wellness program?”

— From the study’s supplement (eMethods 3. Statistical Analysis)

Facty Fact 1: Worksites, Not Workers, Were Randomized

The BJ’s study was not primarily an evaluation of participation outcomes: Continue reading »

What Works: CDC Survey Provides Context for Controversial Wellness Studies

in Data, total worker health, Uncategorized, Employee Wellness Programs

Context iconThe BJ’s Wholesale Club study wasn’t the most important employee wellness research published last month. Let’s look at the Workplace Health in America Survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

When you put the CDC survey together with BJ’s Wholesale Club research as well as last year’s Illinois University worksite wellness study (both employers found that 12-18 months of wellness programming didn’t reduce healthcare costs or improve productivity) we get a more complete picture of relevance.

The CDC asked about companies’ employee health promotion programs. 2,843 respondents completed surveys — targeting whoever in the company was most knowledgeable about its wellness offerings — from a variety of employers.

Here’s some of what the survey found: Continue reading »

Health Circles — A Hospital’s Evidence-Based Solution for Better Employee Health and Performance

in Wellbeing, job design, industrial organizational psychology

Health Circles is a structured process in which employees hold facilitated meetings over a course of time to identify what’s holding their health back and what can be done to improve it – with an emphasis on job design and the psychosocial health risks at the workplace.

This excerpt from a webinar (hosted by Lumity) describes a multi-year, controlled study of hospital nurses and aides at a hospital Continue reading »

Free e-book: Now We’re Talking! Transform Your Wellness Program With an All-Out Communication Strategy

in Uncategorized, Communications

Wellness Program communication e-book

There’s no need to be either frustrated or complacent with low engagement in whatever you offer employees. Download the free ebook, Now We’re Talking!, written by Jozito’s Bob Merberg and published by HES, to learn how it’s done.

It’s not just for walking clubs and smoking cessation programs. For example: Everyone’s talking about mental health, and lots of employers name EAP as their main mental health at work intervention. But EAP utilization is typically 4% or less (sadly, 7% is often considered good). When I oversaw EAP for an employer, utilization averaged between 14% and 18%… because, once we had excellent program pieces in place (integrating it with wellness, absence management, and other functions; implementing proactive EAP outreach to at-risk employees rather than just passively waiting to be contacted by those in crisis), we communicated about it: All the time. Everywhere.

Download the ebook and get started achieving the participation, engagement, and results you’ve always wanted.

Notes on Physician Burnout

in Stress, job strain

When job burnout was first described by Christina Maslach et al, it was specific to caring professionals. Eventually, it was found that it can occur in all occupations and across all demographics. Physician and nurse burnout has been the hot topic the last few years, though a recent meta-analysis pointed out that there’s little that can be concluded about physician burnout because of the level of variation in definition and measurement (a lot of people disagree with this).

Studies have found that pervasiveness of Electronic Medical Records plays a big role in physician burnout. This makes sense, as it can be connected to several of the known burnout antecedents, especially autonomy/control, but also unsatisfactory social interaction and values conflict.

For anyone who wants to quickly get up-to-speed on burnout research, I recommend “Burnout: 35 years of research and practice,” authored by Schaufeli, Maslach, and Leiter.

Toot Your Own Horn

in Uncategorized, Communications, Employee Wellness Programs

When skillfully incorporated into a broader strategy, external recognition for wellness programs has the potential to be a win-win, serving both the employer and the employees.

In keeping with my recent theme of providing practical tools and tips for wellness managers who do the hard work of creating and operating employee wellness programs in complex corporate environments, I’m pleased to share this post I wrote for one of my clients.

Behavior-Based Programs Have Their Place — Near The End Of An Employee Wellbeing Process

in total worker health, Uncategorized, job design, job strain
NIOSH Hierarchy of Controls for Total Worker HealthHierarchy of Controls applied to NIOSH Total Worker Health

I agree with the position paper, Behaviour-Based Safety Programs, recently published by The International Union of Food, Agricultural, Hotel, Restaurant, Catering, Tobacco and Allied Workers’ Associations (IUF). An employer’s primary role in employee wellbeing is to protect employees from Continue reading »

Organizational Justice (and Psychological Breach), Well Summarized

in Featured, industrial organizational psychology

wordcloud-- fair unbiased neutral impartial just nonpartisanScience For Work summarizes research-based evidence that can guide business management decisions, with emphasis on industrial and organizational psychology. Their recent post, Why You Should Consider Fairness When Designing Your Change Management Process, exemplifies the well-researched, practical, and engaging content this non-profit organization provides. The topic, organizational justice, can be difficult to comprehend by well-being professionals for whom organizational behavior is uncharted territory. But Science for Work does a fine job breaking it down. See their infographic (below) followed by my two cents, then head on over to ScienceForWork.com to learn more. Continue reading »

Black Lung Epidemic Ravages Coal Miners

in Top 10 2018

coal miner

“It’s an epidemic and clearly one of the worst industrial medicine disasters that’s ever been described… Thousands of cases of the most severe form of black lung. And we’re not done counting yet.”

— Scott Laney, epidemiologist, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, quoted by NPR.

A gut-wrenching expose about coal miners and black lung disease warrants a special position as Number 11 on my list of Top 10 Employee Wellness Stories of 2018.

NPR and Frontline recently introduced findings from a multi-year investigation, reviewing data going back 20 years.

It’s too much detail to share here, but to get up to speed, you can: Continue reading »

TimesUp: New Regs About Women on Boards May Disrupt Employee Wellness

in Top 10 2018, Wellbeing

 

California mandates that publicly traded companies based in the state have a minimum of one woman on their boards of directors by the end of 2019. If the new regulation survives anticipated legal challenges, representation will increase: By the end of July 2021, companies have to have at least 2 women on boards of 5 members; at least 3 women on larger boards.

If states can require corporations to place women on their boards, how far are we from Continue reading »

Everything We Know About Obesity and Nutrition May Be Wrong

in Top 10 2018, Uncategorized

Wrong Way Sign

In 2018 a Huffington Post article, Everything You Know About Obesity Is Wrongwent viral, debunking myths about obesity and weight loss. It argued that the “war against obesity” has really been a war against obese people, fostering a culture that encourages fat shaming and alienates overweight people.

2 Slices of Bacon Daily Shortens Life by a Decade?

An article by Stanford’s John Ioannidis, which called for radical reform of nutritional research and went viral in research circles, argues that most studies tying nutrients to health outcomes are bunk.

Ioannidis illustrates his point by describing the real-life implications were we to assume studies of individual foods are legit:

…eating 12 hazelnuts daily would prolong life by 12 years (ie, 1 year per hazelnut), drinking 3 cups of coffee daily would achieve a gain of 12 years, and eating a single mandarin orange daily would add 5 years of life. Conversely, consuming 1 egg daily would reduce life expectancy by 6 years, and eating 2 slices of bacon daily would shorten life by a decade, an effect worse than smoking. Could these results possibly be true?

Ioannidis blames researchers’ failure to properly account for confounding factors:

Relatively uncommon chemicals within food…may be influential. Risk-conferring nutritional combinations may vary by an individual’s genetic background, metabolic profile, age, or environmental exposures. Disentangling the potential influence on health outcomes of a single dietary component from these other variables is challenging, if not impossible.

He also blames selective publication of studies that proclaim a correlation between a food and a health outcome over studies that show no correlation. And he throws shade on nutrition advocates…

Expert-driven guidelines shaped by advocates dictate what primary studies should report.

Ioannidis didn’t even dig into the type of academic misconduct described in the first story on my Top 10 list, Mindless Cheating.

The Good News

But there’s a valuable learning — making this Number 9 on my list of Top 10 Wellness Stories of the year — we can take from all these stories. The lessons from Ioannidis’ article and Huffpo’s obesity article are essentially the same.

Pursuit of continuous improvement in the promotion of employee well-being demands skepticism.

We have to maintain idealism to believe we can do better. My New Year’s resolution is to cultivate even more optimism in the pursuit of measurable progress, knowledge, and improvement.

Join me?

(¯`·._) (¯`·._)

Number 8: Do New Physical Activity Guidelines Refute Classic Advice?

in Top 10 2018

Exercise

Quiz:

True or False?

  1. No amount of exercise will make a difference if you sit 8 hours a day.
  2. The risks of trying to get all your exercise into one day per week outweigh the potential benefits.
  3. Benefits of physical activity like better sleep, reduced anxiety, improved cognition, reduced blood pressure, and improved insulin sensitivity take weeks or even months to appear. You can’t expect immediate results.

If you answered “True” to any of these statements, and they are typical of the kind of advice your wellness program participants receive, it’s probably time to update your knowledge. Check out the 2nd edition of Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Its release is 8th on my list of Top 10 Wellness Stories of 2018.

(¯`·._) (¯`·._)

Did you miss the full list of Top 10 Wellness Stories? They are:

  1. Food Nudger Gets Caught with a Hand in the Cookie Jar
  2. Illinois Gets Its Fill of Noise as Wellness Study Sparks a Squabble
  3. Civility at Work: A Matter of Good Health
  4. West Virginia Teachers Give Outcomes-Based Wellness an “F”
  5. Getting to Work on Mental Health
  6. Musculoskeletal Disorder Comes of Age
  7. Our Quest for Employer Role Models Needs a Better Search

ALL TOP 10

Searching for Realistic Role Models

in Top 10 2018

Searching for better role modelsWe’re often advised not to compare our lives to what we see from our friends on Facebook and Instagram. The theory goes: People tend to expose on social media only the best, happiest facets of their lives, and comparing our own ordinary existence to the world-traveling, fancy-food-eating filtered glimpses we get of Continue reading »

New Attention on Mental Health at Work

in Top 10 2018, Uncategorized

mental healthThis is the 5th in my Top 10 Wellness Stories of 2018.

Not long ago, I attended a panel discussion in which an audience member asked the panelists what their organizations were doing to address mental health. No one had anything to say other than, “We offer an EAP.” A wave of ick swept over the room as the tragedy of this truth dawned upon us — the panelists and the audience.

Now, we hear increasingly about workplace mental health. I’ve shared many workplace mental health and psychological wellbeing resources here on the Jozito website.

These readily make clear that countries like Canada, European Union members, and Australia are far ahead of the US in their action planning, and I’ve previously written about Japan’s aggressive approach.

Will the US learn from other countries and develop an evidence-based agenda to address mental health in the workplace (and beyond)?

I’m optimistic and predict that evidence-based solutions prevail.


See ALL TOP 10

Yearning for Civility, “A Matter of Good Health”

in Top 10 2018, industrial organizational psychology

dog and cat civil together3rd of the Top 10 Wellness Stories from 2018

Worldwide, a yearning for civility blossomed in 2018, and workplaces were no exception.

In addition to Christine Porath’s presentation at SHRM, civility surfaced on the agenda of major wellness conferences, and a prominent midwest health care system launched, with some fanfare, an introductory “Choose Civility” e-course. Continue reading »

Illinois Gets Its Fill of Noise as Wellness Study Sparks a Squabble

in Top 10 2018, Uncategorized

"locked horns" over the Illinois workplace wellness study2nd of My Top 10 Wellness Stories from 2018

I’ve written ad nauseam about the University of Illinois Workplace Wellness Study, so allow me to just explain why I’m optimistic about where it’s heading.

This evaluation of an employer’s fledgling wellness program gave wellness critics a rationale to declare employee wellness a failure. The evaluation data, which showed almost no positive outcomes during the program’s startup, is only preliminary and doesn’t say what critics say it says.

Continue reading »

Mindless Cheating

in Top 10 2018, Uncategorized

cheating about nutrition and behavior researchBrian Wansink, author of bestsellers like Mindless Eating and Slim by Design, recently had 13 of his research articles retracted and was nudged right out of his job as director of Cornell Food and Brand Lab, earning a spot on my list of 2018’s biggest wellness stories.

Even if you’ve never heard of Brian Wansink, you’ve probably been affected by his research. His studies, cited more than 20,000 times, are about how our environment shapes how we think about food, and what we end up consuming. He’s one of the reasons Big Food companies started offering smaller snack packaging, in 100 calorie portions. — Vox

Wansink led many headline-grabbing studies of eating behavior, showing, for example, that people eat less when food is served on smaller plates and that pre-ordering lunch leads to healthier choices. His work unleashed many employers’ nutritional wellness strategies, especially “making the healthy choice the easy choice.” Continue reading »

Score Your Job’s Motivating Potential (and learn about job design and well-being)

in job design, industrial organizational psychology, job crafting

Take a test drive of the Job Diagnostics Survey (learn more about the Job Characteristics Model, Job Diagnostics Survey, and Job Motivating Potential in my previous post). These 15 questions generate a “Motivating Potential” score — High Motivating, Moderately Motivating, or Low Motivating — for your job. You’ll get the results instantly, along with brief insights into the components of the score and how to design jobs that are motivating and supportive of employee well-being.

 

Note: This survey is still in development and is available for demo purposes only. The original Job Diagnostics Survey was designed to produce relevant aggregate data when completed by multiple employees. Its creators cautioned against having just one individual complete it to assess a job.


Job Motivating Potential

Please answer all 15 questions. Be as objective as you can in deciding how accurately each statement describes your job — regardless of whether you like or dislike your job. For the first few questions, some of the answer choices don’t have statements beside them. Choose one of these “unlabeled” answers when your sentiment falls somewhere between two statements.

 

Misconduct and Harassment Unmasked Beneath a Veneer of Psychological Safety

in Uncategorized, industrial organizational psychology

Finding sexual misconduct and harassment beneath a veneer of psychological safety

A recent Fast Company article gushes about a particular company’s culture of psychological safety — that is, its “employees’ ability to take risks without feeling insecure or embarrassed.”

Really?

This is a company about which the Department of Labor once said, “Discrimination against women…is quite extreme.”

A New York Times article recently revealed that the company has protected, arguably even rewarded, executives accused of sexual misconduct. It described one exec who “often berated subordinates as stupid or incompetent.” The company “did little to curb that behavior.”

A screenshot the exec’s ex-wife included in a lawsuit, according to the Times, showed an email he sent to another woman: “You will be happy being taken care of,” he wrote. “Being owned is kinda like you are my property, and I can loan you to other people.”

In our quest for a psychological-safety poster child, we may need to conduct a better search.

Sexual misconduct and harassment

The Serious Workplace Mental Health Solutions Take Shape Outside the US

in Stress, job design, job strain

Pay attention to the science-backed workplace mental health frameworks that are taking shape outside the US, like those in Canada, Europe, and Australia.

In the US, the messaging of vendors and consultants tends to drown out science. Last year, for example, data from a meta-analysis — which included more than 120,000 research subjects — showed that job strain (the combination of high demands and low control at work) may lead to clinically diagnosed depression. This is consistent with a lot of other research that points us toward employer strategies for the primary prevention of mental health problems. But psychosocial risk and primary prevention are missing-in-action when we look at mental health resources made available by US employee wellness professional organizations and their vendors/consultant partners, .

Mental health crises — just like physical health crises — are mission critical, but this doesn’t mean we can’t prevent them before they happen and, what’s more, aspire to create workplace environments in which employee well-being flourishes.

Canada’s “Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace” is a compelling example of a social strategy to promote mental health in all its stages — emphasizing primary prevention. Find out more about Canada’s Standard and other science-backed workplace mental health strategies on the Jozito mental health resources hub.

Employee Happiness: “A Great Idea that Didn’t Work Out.”

in Uncategorized

In 2013, Carol Harnett and Fran Melmed interviewed Bob Merberg for their CoHealth CheckUp podcast (which is no longer in production). They asked him to discuss a “great idea that didn’t work out.” In this 2-minute answer, he talks about a positive psychology intervention designed to help employees cultivate happiness.

You can listen to the entire interview here.

 

 

Center for Workplace Mental Health – Website (US)

in Workplace Mental Health Resources, -website

This American Psychiatric Association site “provides employers the tools, resources and information needed to promote and support the mental health of employees and their families.”

Though the site doesn’t significantly address primary prevention, APA’s Center for Workplace Mental Health site does cover important topics that have not yet been addressed on many other sites, such as:
Continue reading »