Why We Love Ruthless HR Execs

in Uncategorized

The vendor blog post “Why We Love Patty McCord” perpetuates the cult-like status of an HR exec who made a name for herself blurring the lines between leading with transparency and leading with fear. Early on, the blog post proclaims that great workplace culture “requires companies to show employees they care.” 

Another worthwhile read, which lends insight into why the aforementioned exec was fired (falling victim to the consequences of the culture she fomented), is “Working at Netflix Sounds Absolutely Terrifying.” The exec, this article reports, left a legacy of a “harsh, hyper-competitive office culture.” This is the same exec the “great caring culture” vendor says “we love.”

Do the simplistic platitudes that permeate our discussions of corporate culture enable workplaces to cloak ruthlessness as transparency?

Hire Based on Facts, Not Feels

in Data, Uncategorized, Featured, industrial organizational psychology

a heart, symbolizing the error of hiring job candidates based on subjective observations and feelingsIs it enough for a job candidate to “show up” for an interview?

A prominent voice on LinkedIn recently garnered more than 17,000 likes with a post that read, in part:

We just hired a Gen-Z candidate with zero experience. Here’s why… They arrived 10 min early for their morning interview (respect ✊), pronounced my name correctly (major kudos), had a firm handshake, dressed sharp, and brought a hard copy of their resume (I didn’t need it). During the interview they smiled, made eye contact, and were honest about having zero experience (we value honesty). They asked me questions, they wanted to learn, they showed up! To all the hiring decision makers out there, don’t disqualify candidates because they don’t have “experience.”

By all means, don’t discriminate against Gen-Z or any other Gen, or against candidates who don’t have experience if the job doesn’t require it. But be smart about hiring, based on Continue reading »

The Worst of Times, The Best of Times for Financial Wellbeing

in Uncategorized, Wellbeing

A man giving or taking money

In 2019, employees filed a class action lawsuit against a prominent employer for allegedly selling out its workers’ 401(k), costing the plan tens of millions of dollars in excess fees and underperformance, in exchange for mega-donations and lavish personal gifts. These shady dealings with employees’ savings were being finagled at the same time financial wellness program promotions admonished employees to “understand their values and get their finances in order.” (Learn more in my Financial Whatness? article.)

On the other hand, Dan Price of Gravity Payments, who, in 2015 raised his company’s minimum wage to $70,000 per year while slashing his own salary, launched a plan in 2019 to establish the same healthy wage for employees of a new acquisition in Boise, Idaho. Mr. Price has his naysayers, but you’ll be convinced he understands his values when it comes to employee wellbeing — financial and otherwise — after you listen to this interview:

S4 EP13: The CEO Who Radically Cut His Pay to Give His Employees a Radical Raise